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1. FEMA lists 15 functions in its Emergency Management Exercise Reporting System. FEMA defines a function as “an action or operation required in emergency response or recovery.” Any or all of those may be the primary or secondary focus of an exercise. Pick ESF #6 – Mass Care, Emergency Assistance, Housing, and Human Services & Describe how this function would be used in a response.2. Envision an imaginary emergency operations plan for a small rural hospital ‘Anywhere General in US.”As the new disaster planner for AG, Administration has asked you to review that plan and make recommendations for change.Using the knowledge you gained, write a brief (250-500 words) summary of that fictional plan. That summary – which you should address to AG’s Board of Directors and CEO – should include parts of the plan you think are adequate and areas you think should be modified.Reference to appropriate authoritative resources and official websites. Must be accessible online. Use New Times Roman 12 font with 1” margins and APA style. The answer should be at least 500 words.The required readings:- IS-139a Lesson 1- Exercise Design Considerations (attached).- PKEMRA (attached).- FEMA Emergency Support Functions ESF (attached).- PPD-8 Presidential Policy Directive/PPD-8: National Preparedness: https://www.dhs.gov/presidential-policy-directive-8-national-preparednessAlso, there are 2 file attached for Q2 as examples, but you must do your original work.
e1.docx

e2.docx

fema_esfs_2008.pdf

is_139a_.docx

10_25_2011_five_years_later_assessment_of_pkemra_1_.pdf

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Envision an imaginary emergency operations plan for a small rural hospital ‘Anywhere
General.” As the new disaster planner for AG, Administration has asked you to review
that plan and make recommendations for change. Using the knowledge you gained write a
brief (250-500 words) summary of that fictional plan. That summary – which you should
address to AG’s Board of Directors and CEO – should include parts of the plan you think
are adequate and areas you think should be modified.
Attention Anywhere General’s Board of Directors and CEO,
After reviewing AG’s current emergency operations plan (EOP), a number of gaps and
opportunities for improvement have been identified. It is critical that healthcare system planners
continuously ensure that their EOPs take into account the changing landscape of requirements,
regulations, threats, and hazards, and complement local emergency operations plans.
Furthermore, complying with standards and following key principals of emergency management
programs (EMP) will help AG be better prepared in a disaster event.
Keeping in mind the preparedness planning cycle, the following plan revisions and actions are
recommended to maintain a progressive and effective EOP.
While the AG EOP is complete, it is also outdated. A hazard vulnerability analysis (HVA)
should be performed every year in order to maintain awareness of changing threats. The first step
of AG EOP improvement planning is to perform a current HVA. This will allow the emergency
planner to more effectively plan for potential threats, both most likely and catastrophic.
The evacuation plan, lockdown plans, and surge plan appear current and effective. The
decontamination plan, however, has not been exercised in four years. Considering the nuclear
plant in the area, this plan will be revised, and then an exercise program will be developed
beginning with a seminar to update staff on new policies and procedures, followed by a tabletop
and then functional exercise.
The next most pressing concern is the reliability of the communication system with partner
agencies including EMS, law enforcement, and the County. While the current communication
plan makes use of the available resources, it is critical that we establish redundancy in the event
of communication failure.
To carry out the above recommendations AG must apply for a grant in order to fund the
exercises and communication infrastructure improvements. These improvements are necessary in
order to meet the National Preparedness Goal’s core capabilities, specifically Threats and Hazard
Identification, Operational Coordination, and Environmental Response/Health and Safety.
Envision an imaginary emergency operations plan for a small rural hospital ‘Anywhere General.” As the new
disaster planner for AG, Administration has asked you to review that plan and make recommendations for
change. Using the knowledge you gained and write a brief (250-500 words) summary of that fictional
plan. That summary – which you should address to AG’s Board of Directors and CEO – should include parts
of the plan you think are adequate and areas you think should be modified.
To the Board of Directors and CEO of Anywhere General,
I have recently reviewed the hospital EOP in an effort to identify potential weaknesses in our
emergency operations. I have made identifications of potential areas of improvement and
provided my recommendations for revision and improvement.
1.
2.
3.
Frequency of drills: Currently, our staff only practice our activation of the HICS once every two years. To improve
our response and keep people knowledgeable on the procedures involved we should be doing two every year. This
ensures that our more positions with lower retention rates are prepared in the event of an emergency, and the
operations become “muscle memory” for our more permanent staff.
Surge capacity: With the expansion of the Emergency Department, we should re-evaluate our surge capacity limits.
The additional space, equipment, and staffing levels have likely altered our capability to handle additional patients.
Memorandums of Understanding: Currently, we have an MOU with one EMS agency in the surrounding area. Due
to their staffing levels and the number of transport units we should consider reaching out to other agencies in the
county. In the event an incident happens in their primary coverage zone they will likely be occupied by the response
and unavailable for patient transfers.
In addition to these areas of improvement, I have identified other areas that were strong in our
current EOP. This includes our isolation and decontamination protocols and systems, stockpile of
necessary medications and other supplies, and security personnel staffing levels. Additionally, I
am pleased with the current ability of the hospital to remain functional in the event of a power
outage and the location of the generators. Our backup communication systems are strong as well,
although staff could benefit from more practice.
I will be meeting with the Disaster Committee to discuss other, minor, aspects of the EOP and
will submit the revised document to you pending feedback on the areas of improvement I
identified. Additionally, I will be at the next board meeting to field questions prior to making
changes to the official plan. Thank you for your assistance in making Anywhere General safer,
and more prepared for the unthinkable.
January 2008
National Response Framework: Overview
Page i
This document was developed expressly for emergency management practitioners as an
overview of the process, roles, and responsibilities for requesting and providing all forms of
Federal assistance. This overview also presents a summary of each of the 15 Emergency
Support Function Annexes and 8 Support Annexes including their purpose, capabilities,
membership, and concept of operations. The complete annexes are contained in the online
NRF Resource Center.
For further information on how the Nation conducts incident response, refer to the National
Response Framework.
January 2008
National Response Framework: Overview
Page i
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Page ii
National Response Framework: Overview
January 2008
CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION ………………………………………………………………………………………… 1
KEY PLAYERS …………………………………………………………………………………………… 2
Local Governments
Tribal Governments
State Governments
Federal Government
Nongovernmental Organizations
Private Sector
FEDERAL ASSISTANCE ………………………………………………………………………………… 4
Federal Support to States
Federal-to-Federal Support
REFERENCE TABS
Emergency Support Function (ESF) Annex Summaries…………………………………9
Introduction …………………………………………………………………………………….11
ESF #1 – Transportation…………………………………………………………………….13
ESF #2 – Communications ………………………………………………………………….15
ESF #3 – Public Works and Engineering ………………………………………………….17
ESF #4 – Firefighting ………………………………………………………………………..19
ESF #5 – Emergency Management ………………………………………………………..21
ESF #6 – Mass Care, Emergency Assistance, Housing, and Human Services ………23
ESF #7 – Logistics Management and Resource Support ……………………………….25
ESF #8 – Public Health and Medical Services ……………………………………………27
ESF #9 – Search and Rescue……………………………………………………………….29
ESF #10 – Oil and Hazardous Materials Response………………………………………..31
ESF #11 – Agriculture and Natural Resources …………………………………………….33
ESF #12 – Energy ……………………………………………………………………………..35
ESF #13 – Public Safety and Security ………………………………………………………37
ESF #14 – Long-Term Community Recovery ……………………………………………..39
ESF #15 – External Affairs ……………………………………………………………………41
Support Annex Summaries …………………………………………………………………….43
Introduction …………………………………………………………………………………….45
Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources …………………………………………………47
Financial Management ………………………………………………………………………..49
International Coordination ……………………………………………………………………51
Private-Sector Coordination ………………………………………………………………….53
Public Affairs ……………………………………………………………………………………55
Tribal Relations …………………………………………………………………………………57
Volunteer and Donations Management …………………………………………………….59
Worker Safety and Health ……………………………………………………………………61
January 2008
National Response Framework: Overview
Page iii
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Page iv
National Response Framework: Overview
January 2008
INTRODUCTION
The National Response Framework (NRF) presents the guiding principles that enable all
response partners to prepare for and provide a unified national response to disasters
and emergencies – from the smallest incident to the largest catastrophe. The
Framework defines the key principles, roles, and structures that organize the way we
respond as a Nation. It describes how communities, tribes, States, the Federal
Government, and private-sector and nongovernmental partners apply these principles
for a coordinated, effective national response. The National Response Framework is
always in effect, and elements can be implemented at any level at any time.
This Overview supports and provides additional guidance concerning the Framework. In
particular, this document focuses on the essential processes for requesting and receiving
Federal assistance and summarizes the key response capabilities and essential support
elements provided through the Emergency Support Function (ESF) Annexes and Support
Annexes.
The Overview includes the following topics:
1. Key Players: Organizations and entities that may either need assistance or provide
assistance
2. Federal Assistance: Descriptions of the processes for requesting and obtaining
Federal assistance in support of States, tribes, local jurisdictions, and other Federal
partners
3. Emergency Support Function Annexes: Summaries of the 15 ESF Annexes,
which group Federal resources and capabilities into functional areas to serve as the
primary mechanisms for providing assistance at the operational level
4. Support Annexes: Summaries of the 8 Support Annexes, which describe essential
supporting aspects that are common to all incidents
The Framework also includes Incident Annexes that address specific categories of
contingencies or hazard situations requiring specialized application of Framework
mechanisms. The Incident Annexes are not directly addressed or summarized in this
support document. Readers should review the Incident Annexes on the NRF Resource
Center, http://www.fema.gov/NRF.
Details relating to requesting and receiving assistance, as well as the authorities under
which assistance is provided, are available on the NRF Resource Center. Response
Partner Guides, information on Stafford Act and non-Stafford Act assistance, all
annexes, and a listing of legal authorities are available on this Web site.
January 2008
National Response Framework: Overview
Page 1
KEY PLAYERS
LOCAL GOVERNMENTS
Local governments (counties, cities, or towns) respond to emergencies daily using their
own resources. They also rely on mutual aid and assistance agreements with
neighboring jurisdictions when they need additional resources. The National Incident
Management System (NIMS) provides information on mutual aid and assistance
agreements.
When local jurisdictions cannot meet incident response resource needs with their own
resources or with help available from other local jurisdictions, they may ask the State for
assistance.
TRIBAL GOVERNMENTS
Tribal governments respond to the same range of emergencies and disasters that other
jurisdictions face. They may require assistance from neighboring jurisdictions under
mutual aid and assistance agreements and may provide assistance as well.
The United States has a trust relationship with Indian tribes and recognizes their right to
self-government. As such, tribal governments are responsible for coordinating resources
to address actual or potential incidents. When local resources are not adequate, tribal
leaders seek assistance from States or the Federal Government.
For certain types of Federal assistance, tribal governments work with the State, but as
sovereign entities they can also elect to deal directly with the Federal Government for
other types of assistance. In order to obtain Federal assistance via the Robert T.
Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act), the State Governor
must request a Presidential declaration on behalf of a tribe.
STATE GOVERNMENTS
The State helps local governments if they need assistance. States have significant
resources of their own, including emergency management and homeland security
agencies, State police, health agencies, transportation agencies, incident management
teams, specialized teams, and the National Guard.
If additional resources are required, the State may request assistance from other States
through interstate mutual aid and assistance agreements such as the Emergency
Management Assistance Compact (EMAC). Administered by the National Emergency
Management Association, EMAC is a congressionally ratified organization that provides
form and structure to the interstate mutual aid and assistance process. 1
If an incident is beyond the local and State capabilities, the Governor can seek Federal
assistance. The State will collaborate with the impacted communities and the Federal
Government to provide the help needed.
1
For more detail about EMAC, see http://www.emacweb.org/.
Page 2
National Response Framework: Overview
January 2008
KEY PLAYERS
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
The Federal Government maintains a wide array of capabilities and resources that can
assist State governments in responding to incidents. Federal departments and agencies
provide this assistance using processes outlined later in this document. In addition,
Federal departments and agencies may also request and receive help from other Federal
departments and agencies.
NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS
Nongovernmental and voluntary organizations are essential partners in responding to
incidents. Working through emergency operations centers and other structures,
nongovernmental and voluntary organizations assist local, tribal, State, and Federal
governments in providing sheltering, emergency food supplies, counseling services, and
other vital support services to support response and promote the recovery of disaster
victims. These groups often provide specialized services that help individuals with
special needs, including those with disabilities.
To engage these key partners most effectively, local, tribal, State, and Federal
governments coordinate with voluntary agencies, existing Voluntary Organizations Active
in Disaster (VOADs), community and faith-based organizations, and other entities to
develop plans to manage volunteer services and donated goods, establish appropriate
roles and responsibilities, and train and exercise plans and procedures before an incident
occurs.
PRIVATE SECTOR
Forming the foundation for the health of the Nation’s economy, the private sector is a
key partner in local, tribal, State, and Federal incident management activities. The
private sector is responsible for most of the critical infrastructure and key resources in
the Nation and thus may require assistance in the wake of a disaster or emergency.
They also provide goods and services critical to the response and recovery process,
either on a paid basis or through donations.
January 2008
National Response Framework: Overview
Page 3
FEDERAL ASSISTANCE
Federal disaster assistance is often thought of as synonymous with Presidential
declarations and the Stafford Act. The fact is that Federal assistance can be provided to
State, tribal, and local jurisdictions, and to other Federal departments and agencies, in a
number of different ways through various mechanisms and authorities. Federal
assistance does not always require coordination by the Department of Homeland
Security (DHS) and may be provided without a Presidential major disaster or emergency
declaration.
Federal assistance for incidents that do not require DHS coordination may be led by
other Federal departments and agencies consistent with their authorities. The Secretary
of Homeland Security may monitor such incidents and may activate Framework
mechanisms to provide support to departments and agencies without assuming overall
leadership for the Federal response to the incident.
FEDERAL SUPPORT TO STATES
STAFFORD ACT
Federal support to States and local jurisdictions takes many forms. The most widely
known authority under which assistance is provided for major incidents is the Stafford
Act.
When an incident occurs that exceeds or is anticipated to exceed local, tribal, or State
resources, the Governor can request Federal assistance under the Stafford Act. The
Stafford Act authorizes the President to provide financial and other assistance to State
and local governments, certain private nonprofit organizations, and individuals to
support response, recovery, and mitigation efforts following Presidential emergency or
major disaster declarations.
Most incidents are not of sufficient magnitude to warrant a Presidential declaration.
However, if State and local resources are insufficient, a Governor may ask the President
to make such a declaration. Before making a declaration request, the Governor must
activate the State’s emergency plan and ensure that all appropriate State and local
actions have been taken or initiated, including but not limited to:

Surveying the affected areas to determine the extent of private and public damage.

Conducting joint preliminary damage assessments with Federal Emergency
Management Agency (FEMA) officials to estimate the types and extent of Federal
disaster assistance required.
Ordinarily, only the Governor can initiate a request for a Presidential emergency or
major disaster declaration. In extraordinary circumstances, the President may
unilaterally make such a declaration. The Governor’s request is made through the FEMA
Regional Administrator and based on a finding that the disaster is of such severity and
magnitude that effective response is beyond the capabilities of the State and affected
local governments, and that Federal assistance is necessary.
Page 4
National Response Framework: Overview
January 2008
FEDERAL ASSISTANCE
The Governor’s request includes:

Information on the extent and nature of State resources that have been or will be
used to address the consequences of the disaster.

A certification by the Governor that State and local governments will assume all
applicable non-Federal costs required by the Stafford Act.

An estimate of the types and amounts of supplementary Federal assistance
required.

Designatio …
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