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– Need more than 8 scholarly references.- The referencing style we use is the MLA style, the format of the essay is in MLA format, and please do not use fake references.- I hope to get a very high level essay and get a great mark.- All requirements are in the attachment.
essay_requirement.docx

essay_marking_rubric.pdf

what_is_a_research_essay_.pdf

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This assignment is a research essay. Word-limit is 2000 words. It will only consider the
televisual texts in this unit, not the two films that we looked at initially. Please refer in detail
to two texts from the following list:
1.
Stranger Things (cr. Duffer Bros, Netflix, 2016- )
2.
Orange is the New Black (cr. Kohan, Netflix, 2016- )
3.
Maniac (cr. Somerville, dir. Fukunaga, Netflix, 2018)
4.
The Handmaid’s Tale (cr. Miller, Hulu, 2017- )
5.
Jessica Jones (cr. Rosenberg, Netflix, 2015-19)
6.
Atlanta (cr. Glover, FX, 2016- )
7.
Fyre: The Greatest Party that Never Happened (dir. Chris Smith, Netflix, 2019)
8.
GLOW (cr. Flahive and Mensch, Netflix, 2017)
1.
Essay questions—please answer one of these:
Analyse the ways in which long-form television creates alternate societies and values, drawing on
examples from two series from the unit.
2.
How do families function as both binding and repulsive, and why? Your answer should draw on
examples from two series from the unit.
3.
To what extent do The Handmaid’s Tale, Jessica Jones and Orange is the New Black function as
political (particularly feminist) allegory? Equally, in what ways do these texts also move beyond
their allegorical status? (Choose two texts.)
4.
Discuss the role of melodrama (as defined by Laura Mulvey) in any two televisual texts we have
studied. Provide specific examples from these texts.
5.
Compare the ‘upside down’ in Stranger Things with the dreams that take place in Maniac. What
does each of these zones represent in their respective texts and what is their relationship to real
life?
6.
In what ways does celebrity culture determine the worlds we see depicted
in Fyre, Atlanta and GLOW. (Choose 2 texts.)
7.
In slightly different ways, ‘retro’ features in Stranger Things, GLOW and Maniac. With reference to
two of these texts, discuss the significance of retro. In what ways is this particular kind of past
(i.e. the ‘retro’ past) important to the text?
8.
Consider the role of comedy in Orange is the New Black, Maniac, Atlanta and GLOW. Choosing two
of these texts, provide examples which show the different ways that comedy gets deployed.
9.
Discuss the significance of class in any two of the following texts: Orange is the New
Black, Atlanta, Fyre and GLOW.
10. Explore the relationship between crime and femininity (or being a woman) in Orange is the New
Black and Jessica Jones.
Essay Marking Rubric
Marking criteria
Organisation:
Criteria
HD 80-100%
D 70-79%
CR 60-69%
P 50-59%
N 0-49%
The essay begins with a clear argument
and point of view. The body of the essay
lucidly articulates a critical position on the
text, and applies relevant and illuminating
theories or concepts to the text analysed.
The essay cogently and persuasively
analyses the themes and/or issues
raised by the text, supported by
examples from the text as well as
relevant references to other literature and
scholarship. The conclusion leaves the
reader with a memorable final point that
illuminates such themes as the text’s
formal, thematic, or intertextual
significance.
The essay begins with a
clear argument or
perspective. The body
introduces and explains
the concepts and themes
relevant to the critical
analysis, and elaborates
on the themes and/or
issues in the text with the
support of pertinent
textual examples. The
conclusion provides a
concise and focused
review of the content and
value of the text though
may be lacking in wider
significance or a
successfully integrated
point of view.
The essay begins with
a clear argument and
indicates a critical
position on some
aspect of the text
analysed. The body
provides an
interpretive framework
with some but not
entirely sufficient
support from examples
in the text. The
conclusion brings the
review to an
appropriate close but
tends to recapitulate
rather than drawing
attention to the wider
contextual and critical
significance, of the text
analysed.
The essay correctly
identifies the text and
other sources, but does
not clearly indicate a
critical position on the
text analysed. The body
gives only partial or
confusing criteria for a
critical assessment of
the text and does not
convince as to the
relevance of those
criteria to the themes
and ideas in the text.
The conclusion may be
weak, repetitive or
missing.
The essay fails to
provide the correct
details of the text and
other sources. The body
does not develop a
critical position. No
organisational plan is
evident.
Comprehension and analysis:
Written
expression:
MLA
Citation:
Draws from the secondary literature,
demonstrating extensive and thoughtfully
considered research of themes and ideas
beyond those introduced in the lectures.
Main themes to be discussed are clearly
and concisely described and analysed in
a way that expresses an understanding
of the relevant historical/generic context
and creative purpose of the text .The
essay is able to effectively position itself
in relation to scholarly debates about the
text and engage in informed,
sophisticated critical analysis of the text
that is supported by textual examples.
Evaluation provides a connected
interpretation, linking various aspects of
the text to the chosen essay topic with
insight. The interpretation provides a
nuanced analysis of the significance of
the text.
Draws from the
secondary literature
beyond the lectures, able
to conceptualise and
justify a point of view
through germane
interconnections between
the ideas and themes
explored. Evidence of
depth of understanding is
demonstrated through
succinct details
highlighting key points
and themes drawn from
the text. Essay shows
evidence, with some
limitations, of reasoned
judgment and pertinent
analysis of the text
supported by research.
The tone and style is lucid, engaging,
nuanced and illuminating without being
blandly neutral or overly judicious. Free
of grammatical, lexical (choice of
vocabulary) and typographical errors.
The tone and style is
lucid and effective. Mostly
free of grammatical,
lexical, typographical
errors.
Appropriate MLA works cited referencing
and in-text citation is used.
Appropriate MLA
referencing and in-text
citation is used with minor
errors.
Comments:
Draws from the
literature beyond the
lectures to support
conceptualisation of
ideas. While a sound
level of research may
be undertaken,
comments about the
theme/s or issues
presented in the text
may be generalized
and descriptive rather
than specific and
evaluative. Includes
limited but accurate
interpretive approach,
and pertinent but
insufficiently
comparative or
conceptual evaluation
of theme/s or issues
presented in the text.
The writing style is
competent, and mostly
free of awkward
structures or phrasing.
Some distracting
errors in MLA
referencing.
Mostly draws from
subject readings.
Evidence of
understanding is limited
to accurate but
descriptive summaries
and limited analysis
within existing
frameworks of
interpretation. Evidence
of analysis and
evaluation at the
superficial level with
little evidence of
comparative and/or
conceptually informed
approaches that help to
integrate the analysis.
No evidence of research
in the course literature
and understanding is
poor or inaccurate.
Structural and stylistic
defects may make it
difficult to read, but it
adequately
communicates
information.
May have significant
MLA & typographical
errors. Resubmission
may be required.
The writing is poor and
unclear with frequent
errors in areas such as
spelling, grammar,
syntax, sentence
structure.
Does not conform to the
MLA guidelines.
Resubmission may be
required.
What is a research essay?
By research we don’t mean typing the essay question into Google, seeing what comes up,
and cutting and pasting this into a word document.
In English and Literary Studies, research is not primarily about finding stuff out. Rather it is
about trying to clarify issues so that they can be adequately tested against the text.
1. Step 1 is to think carefully about the question you want to answer. We’ve formulated
these in fairly general terms to give you scope for independent thought. But this does not
mean we want you to answer the question in general terms. We want you to answer the
question specifically and with direct reference to examples from the text.
2. Step 2 is to start breaking down the general question you have chosen into more
particular questions. For example, if you are answering the question on race / class, you
would want to know what race and class mean. Race is perhaps the easier of the two, but
how is class defined? There is nothing wrong with dictionaries, but we don’t really need you
to give us definitions from the dictionary (which we can find ourselves). By ‘defined’ we
really mean how is the concept (e.g. class) treated in the text, what does it mean in the text.
3. Once you think you have a better (i.e. more particularised) idea of the key terms in your
chosen question, then Step 3 is starting to relate these more particularised ideas to
examples from text. Re-watch the program and try and isolate some good examples
(scenes, moments, effects, etc.).
4. Finally, Step 4 is to try and organise these examples, and your interpretation of them,
into an argument which addresses the original question
Okay, but where is the research in this process? The research consists of two main
sources. The first is research that goes to concepts (e.g. what is race and class)? And the
second is research that goes to the nature of the text itself. This might be either things
about the particular text you are looking at or about the class of text it belongs to (e.g. longform television, the genre of crime fiction, etc.)
How many references do I need? This is probably the most asked question in the history of
university essays. Our answer is that less is more. In other words, we would like you to use
your references well—read them carefully, cite them correctly, quote from them effectively,
put the ideas back into your own words, apply them to your texts—rather than just tack
references on for the sake of it. Also, we want you to use references as authorities for
propositions, not as substitutes for developing your own ideas.
The key to the English method of thinking is it goes in two directions at the same time.
On the one hand, it sets out to explore how something—say race or class—is depicted in a
text. On the other hand, we find that as we try to do this, the text shows us something we
didn’t know before about race or class. In English, we believe that texts teach us.
So, we start out trying to find a concept in a text, but we end up with the text teaching us
about a concept. In other words, we believe that while sociologists can define class in
various ways, it takes a creative text (a drama) for us to really understand what this might
mean.
This does mean that English essays are difficult to write, so don’t be too put off if you are
finding it difficult. But because of this, English essays also represent a truly valuable learning
opportunity—something that will help you right through life as you encounter complex and
interconnected problems.

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